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T7287 Wesleyan Theology

  • Unit Code & NameT7287 Wesleyan Theology
  • DescriptionThis unit introduces students to the major themes in Wesleyan theology with a focus on the writings of the remarkable John Wesley, one of the most significant figures in the history of the Church. A final contextual theology essay is designed to apply what is learned to a present social issue.

    This unit introduces students to the Wesleyan theological tradition. Wesleyan distinctives are explored and set within their broad social and historical context.
  • DisciplineTheology
  • LevelUndergraduate
  • Semester1, 2017
  • Delivery ModeOnline, Class
  • DateFor those who take the unit in face to face mode this will be an 'Extensive' unit held over five full Wednesdays 8 February to 8 March from 9.00am until 4.30 pm.

    Online students will access weekly learning activities for the full ten week semester beginning the week of 6 February.
  • Lecturer(s) Assoc Prof Glen O'Brien
  • PrerequisitesT7101 Introduction to Theology or T7105 Introduction to Christian Doctrines
  • Learning ActivitiesLectures, class discussion and presentations, viewing of documentary videos, online activities
  • AssessmentsAnalysis of a primary source, class presentation, contextual theology essay
  • Learning OutcomesAt the end of this unit students will be able to:

    1. Identify the major theological influences on the developing Wesleyan tradition
    2. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the historical context in which Wesleyan theology emerged as a discrete strand of theological thought
    3. Evaluate key Wesleyan themes, such as prevenient grace, the new birth and Christian perfection, and their significance for subsequent theological thought
    4. Analyse source materials in the unit
    5. Creatively apply Wesleyan insights to Christian life and discipleship.
  • Text BooksLangford, Thomas. Practical Divinity. Vol. 2. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1999.
    (Practical Divinity Vol. 1 is recommended but not required).

    Outler, Albert C. John Wesley. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.